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Mick Flannery with support Marlene Enright – Right Here Right Now Festival

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Cork Opera House and Coughlans Live Promotions Presents

Right Here, Right Now

Date: Sunday, 30th April, 2017
Time: 3:00pm (Doors 2:30pm)
Space: The Right Room (On-stage)
Tickets: €20*

*The Right Room is a new and unique use of the stage space in Cork Opera House where the audience join the band on the stage, for an intimate show. Experience Cork Opera House as you’ve never experienced it before in The Right Room.
Capacity is limited so advance booking advised!

*Booking fees apply to telephone and online bookings

 

MICK FLANNERY

http://www.mickflannery.com

In the end of the day and the heel of the hunt, you’re left with the songs. Everything else comes and goes – the shows and the tours and the applause and the acclaim which goes with them, the prattle and the palaver which accompany an album release. Everything else fades out of view. Everything else doesn’t matter in the long run.

But the songs remain. The songs you write on your own stick around. They’re going to be here for many years to come so they deserve to be treated with due care and utmost respect in the creation process.

Mick Flannery realised this a long time ago. He also realised that songwriting was the best part of this strange job of being a jobbing-gigging-talking-singing musician.

“It’s never a chore”, Flannery says about the craft. “The creation is the nicest part, it’s something you always have and you can use it to work through stuff that’s in your head. You have to take it seriously if it’s going to be any good. It’s always my favourite thing, like putting Lego blocks together. You can make a lot of things with Lego.”

You can make an album like “By the Rule”, for instance. It’s Flannery’s fourth album but it’s a world on from anything he has put his name to before now.

“Evening Train” (2007), “White Lies” (2008) and especially 2012’s best-selling and critically acclaimed number one album “Red to Blue” had their advocates and champions. They were significant staging posts along the road for the songwriter from Blarney, signs that he was finding an unique voice and vision, signs that he was finding his feet as he was finding an audience.

We can now consider the apprenticeship to be over. “By the Rule” is the work of a confident, assured songwriter, someone who knows how to turn a list of nouns, adjectives, verbs and adverbs into graceful, minor-key pen-pictures and poetry which will resonate with the listener.

Beneath and beyond the beautifully understated, uncomplicated and uncluttered production on “By the Rule”, Flannery’s songs usher us into a world which is by times emotional, romantic, dark, insightful and hopeful.

It’s a world he brought into being in Berlin. He took a notion to go to Germany and, after a bitter cold winter initially beat him home again, he settled and spent seven months there in 2013. In a flat with big, open rooms and lovely acoustics, Flannery set up base and went to work.

He was largely by himself in the city. He did a college course to learn the language, but there was no social circle or gigs to distract him. He’d wander around that great city, taking in the history and grandeur and pace of the place.

Occasionally, he’d throw on a pair of runners, stick Eminem on the headphones and go for a run. “There’s things he does with words that no-one else does”, Flannery says of the Detroit rapper. “He rhymes two words with one word, the two syllables of one word with match two separate words, internal rhyming, skip rhymes.”

Back at his little room in Kreuzberg, Flannery’s new songs began to slowly take shape. His songs are usually based on stories and experiences he has heard from people or overheard in the clatter of a café or bar.

“I’d be a bit of a detective about people, the way they are, how they behave. You have to care about them. If you only want to write about your own experiences, your own break-ups and trials, you can do that without leaving the house.”

The compelling strengths of “Pride”, “Get What You Give” and “Live In Hope” benefited from Flannery’s methodical approach to getting the lyrical dimensions just right. “It takes me a while to pare them down and get the lyrics correct and make everything as concise as possible. You have to think about the songs again and again and again. You have to have a foothold in the song.”

Back in Ireland, the next job was to record the songs. Flannery called on O Emperor’s Phil Christie (piano) and Alan Comerford (guitar) to give him a hand and liked what they were doing in rehearsals. “They were finding things in the songs and I thought the things they were finding were nice.”

The pair of them joined Flannery, Christian Best (drums), Shane Fitzsimons (bass) and Karen O’Doherty (violin) for a fortnight in Beechpark Studios in Rathcoole in December 2013 with Ryan Freeland (Aimee Mann, Ray LaMontagne, Joe Henry, Ramblin’ Jack Elliot, Carolina Chocolate Drops etc) producing alongside Best.

Flannery knew the sound he wanted and that meant less rather than more playing. “The most effective thing to me is a dynamic when something just swells and gets louder and tenser and effects the listener. There’s no need to play a lot of notes to get that. It’s simple stuff, really.”

A few months on from recording, Flannery is still digging what he and the band produced over that winter fortnight. Unlike his other albums, he an imagine himself listening to this one for many years to come. He likes the way it was recorded and the way it sounds.

He likes the way he sounds too. “I sound like myself here. I’ve been trying to get away from singing with that old American twang which is left over from listening to too much Tom Waits. The more I get away from it, the more comfortable I feel.”

This satisfaction with “By the Rule” could also be about the growing up process. Flannery turned thirty last year and finds he’s less bothered than he used to be by the small stuff. When you get to this age, you’re happy to let the small stuff go.

“When you get to the end of your twenties, you become less self-obsessed. You start worrying less about your feelings. You become calmer. It gradually becomes easier to be yourself.”

“By the Rule”, then: the sound of Mick Flannery getting comfortable in his skin. The sound of a man at ease with his work. The sound of a master songwriter creating his best work to date.

 

 

Marlene Enright

WWW.MARLENEENRIGHT.COM

 

After a busy end to 2016, including an appearance at The Other Voices Festival, Marlene Enright is set to release her forthcoming debut solo album, Placemats and Second Cuts, on March 24th. The Cork based singer-songwriter, whose sound is that of roots music juxtaposed with contemporary indie pop, has announced an Irish tour in support of the album. 

 

“Placemats and Second Cuts was written and recorded on-and-off over a year. The title is a line from the outro of the album’s closing song, We were in Trouble. Hindsight has made me realise that it’s a much more self-reflective album that I initially had realised. It speaks of self-doubt, dancing the fine line between feeling comfortable in your own skin and feeling totally lost at sea, indecisiveness, the battle between strength and weakness, passion and apathy, belonging and isolation and self-acceptance.”

 

“I’ve always loved the infectious grooves of RnB and rap, the warmth and nostalgia delivered by a great folk song tinged with sadness, thickly layered harmonies ala D’Angelo, Bon Iver, Feist and the  girl groups of the 60’s, The Ronettes, The Shirelles, The Shangri- Las.  The songs on Placemats and Second Cuts are musically, for me, a little piece of all these influences.”

 

Catch Marlene Enright on her nationwide tour in support of the album Placemats and Second Cuts throughout the Spring of 2017.

 

“When The Water Is Hot’ is a beautifully formed introduction to the songwriter’s solo work that leaves Enright’s immeasurable talent speak for itself. Beguiling and very promising indeed, Marlene Enright’s debut single, ‘When The Water Is Hot’, is the sound of an artist who has already found their voice.”The Last Mixed Tape

 

“The singer-songwriter has nailed it and her quirky sound falls somewhere between Jenny Lewis and Bjork if you’re looking for comparisons. This could be the start of something very special” — JOE.ie

 

“Full of folk and alt-rock sensibilities with fuzzy guitars, swishy percussion, organ and trumpets. Enright’s vocal might lull you into a false sense of security only to softly remind you that the deepest cuts never came from those who shouted loudest.” Musician.ie 

 

“Fusing R&B and alternative-pop, ‘Underbelly’ finds Marlene Enright weaving catchy hooks, upbeat rhythms and ambitious production around her instantly recognizable vocal. Contrasted by the slow-burning feel of her previous release, this new single adds a sonically vivid new dimension to her music whilst also maintaining the slightly ethereal sound that makes Enright’s solo work so compelling. – Song Of The Week”The Last Mixed Tape

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